Other Priorities

Artist Resale Right

The Artist’s Resale Right was introduced in the UK in 2006, and may entitle you to a royalty when your work is resold by an art market professional.

An art market professional is defined as someone "acting in the course of a business of dealing in works of art”. In practice this includes galleries, auction houses and art dealers, but in general it excludes museums and private individuals.

The Artist’s Resale Right gives artists a fair share of the rising value of their work and is an essential source of income. 
 

Valued at £101.5 billion in 2019, the UK’s creative industries are booming. The contemporary art market is a huge part of this success, but the benefits are not being felt by artists.

Visual artists have an average annual income of £5,000. Royalties pay for studio space and materials, helping them to continue creating the artworks our art market depends on.

Artists’ estates use royalties to fund essential but labour-intensive activities such as cataloguing, archiving and restoration; maintaining culture for future generations.

Since 2006, DACS has paid over £80 million in Resale Right royalties for artists and their estates. We must secure this source of income for artists.

ARR plays a vital role in helping artists sustain their career and more countries are starting to implement their version of the law. This allows for UK artists to receive royalties when their works sell abroad too.

We want ARR to continue to exist in the UK so it can provide vital income for UK artists, who earn an average of £5,000 a year.

We want the UK to encourage other nations to adopt ARR too through trade agreements, so that UK artists do not suffer when their works sell in countries like the USA and China – two big art markets that have not yet implemented an ARR law.  

The Artist’s Resale Right (introduced in the UK in 2006) entitles artists to a royalty when their work is resold by an art market professional. ARR royalties are a much needed income to sustain artists in their practice, with 81 per cent using their ARR for living expenses and art materials. The US does not have ARR, meaning that UK artists and their estates are unable to receive royalties when their works are sold on the secondary market in the US, which is the largest export market for the UK art market.

Unregistered Designs

Parasitic Packaging aka lookalikes; copycats

  • A solution which is proportionate, sustains shopper choice and competition and would not involve costs to the taxpayer.

  • Clear, distinct packaging that differentiates one product from another, does not mislead or deceive consumers and does not trade on another’s reputation.

  • An effective means of resolving packaging disputes to minimise consumer confusion while safeguarding choice and competition.

  • Effective legislation and enforcement in the UK to prevent competitors trading on the reputation of another.

  • Illegally packaged products re-packaged legally and distinctively and returned to the market.

  • The introduction of legislative injunctive powers for businesses against copycat packaging.

The Group supports: clear, distinct packaging that differentiates one product from another, does not mislead or deceive consumers and does not trade on another’s reputation; an effective means of resolving packaging disputes to minimise consumer confusion while safeguarding choice and competition; effective legislation and enforcement in the UK to prevent competitors trading on the reputation of another.

Public Performance Right

Rights of Representation

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© Alliance for Intellectual Property 2019